Mindfulness meditation retreats


The retreats are intended for those, who are already familiar with the practice of mindfulness and would like to use and co-create an environment that is constructive for the development of mindful awareness. They consist of intensive practice of meditation, group discussions and evening lectures about mindfulness-related topics. However, the cultivation of silence is important throughout the duration of a retreat. Even when discussion is allowed, we speak with awareness. We advise against trying to keep in contact with the outside world, via phone or internet. In this way we create less distractions which makes it easier to keep attention on our inner experience.

When we retreat from the complexity and urgent errands of everyday life, we can really start to listen to our body, heart and mind. Silent environment and mindful company makes it easier to stay present with our experience, as it unfolds moment by moment. Our attention sharpens, body calms down, our mind becomes clearer. That creates good conditions for objective observation and understanding of our own experience. Because there are no activities that would allow us to run away from facing ourselves, there is a good chance, we will come out of the retreat knowing ourselves better than before.

TYPES OF RETREATS

Retreats in complete silence are intended for those, who already have experience in meditation retreats and believe that they don’t need additional support or guidance. At the beginning there is an opening discussion, where everyone can share their current mind-state and clarify any questions or dilemmas he/she might have. The remaining of the retreat is spent in silence, the participants following previously arranged schedule. The retreat concludes with another group discussion, where each individual can share their own experience of the retreat, followed by a last communal meal.
The advantage of this type of retreat is an independent practice in a group environment, which supports our intention to cultivate mindfulness.

Guided retreats include more support and guidance in a form of discussions and guided meditations, and are therefore better suited for beginners and those, who prefer to have some directions for their practice. Nevertheless, they are mainly spent in silence, while participants independently further the development of their mindfulness practice.